License To Wed DVD Cover Art
SRP $28.98 2.40:1(16:9) DOLBY DIGITAL 5.1 WARNER BROS
 
License To Wed HDDVD Cover Art
SRP $39.98 2.40:1 DOLBY DIGITAL 5.1 WARNER BROS
 
License To Wed BRAY Cover Art
SRP $34.98 2.40:1 PCM 5.1 WARNER BROS
 

"LICENSE TO WED" has been released on dvd, Hd-dvd and Blu-ray, simultaneously.  John Krasinski and Mandy Moore play a young couple who've fallen in love, and about to marry in a very short time. To win over the girl's conservative family, Krasinski signs the couple up under the tutelage of insane(but "not" funny)Robin Williams as a reverand, determined to lessen divorce rates, by ending relationships destined to fail. While the premise "might" have been funny if handled by more capable talent, there's just nothing funny here. Everything that William's character does, is always so painfully out of left field, that it only feels bizarre. "LICENSE TO WED" actually makes the crude, no holds-barred humor of the Farrelly Brothers seem politically correct in comparison. While Krasinski and Moore are actually amiable, they deserve far better material than they're given here. Williams continues to stupify audiences with yet another absolutely horrid role.  Why a man who has proven his incredible talent with "GOOD WILL HUNTING" and more, would even consider roles like this makes no sense.  Does he really need the money???  Just horrible!

The aspect ratio is correctly presented with a 2.40:1 aspect ratio(16:9 enhancement for dvd)The dvd offers a decent image, with solid detail and solid color values throughout. The blu-ray and hd-dvd offer the same 1080p/VC-1 encoding, making them indistinguishable from one another. Both hi-def formats offer notably improved colors, that are more vibrant in every scene. Contrast is improved as well, offering deeper blacks and grays in darker scenes.  The image typically showcases a "jump off the screen" style of depth. Also, none of the artifacts that present occasionally on the dvd, are present here.

The dvd comes with a Dolby Digital 5.1 mix, whereas the hd-dvd has Dolby TrueHD 5.1, and the blu-ray offers PCM 5.1.  None of the mixes offer much in the terms of separation, focusing on center channel for the majority of the film, with a modest amount of front channel separation. Surrounds do kick in on rare occasion to boost the music and in a brief action sequence. The mixes are adequate, however the Dolby TrueHD and PCM 5.1 mix offer better dynamic range.

The extras, including deleted scenes(worthless) and an interactive game, are offered on all three formats.  

 

 
anamorphic widescreen transfer on this DVD is very nice, with a clean image, a rather solid level of detail, and appropriate color throughout. There's nothing noticeably wrong with the picture, including a lack of dirt and damage and no obvious digital artifacts, though some haloing can be seen along hard edges in some spots,

The Dolby Digital 5.1 track is just what you'd expect from a romantic comedy like