Marley & Me (Blu-ray)
SRP $39.99 2.35:1 DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 FOX
 

FOX has released one of the best films of 2008, "MARLEY AND ME," on blu-ray.  Anyone shying away from the film, thinking it's merely just an adorable "dog" movie, is missing out on a lot. Sure, it's hard not to smile while watching the antics of a labrador retriever, but "MARLEY AND ME" will surprise many, in the intelligent way that the script and film balances the "dog ownership" theme of the story, with many other important themes and the struggles everyone goes through in growing, achieving one's dreams, dealing with loss, disappointment and much more. Corny as it may sound,  "MARLEY AND ME" is a profound film, and a "must-see!" Regardless of whether one's a Owen Wilson or Jennifer Aniston fan, neither have been better or more amiable than they are here. As with Kirsten Dunst's character in "ELIZABETHTOWN," anyone would want a wife as portrayed by Aniston here. She's really that good, without any of the whinning that's pervaded and diminished her abilities in other films. Alan Arkin, although not on screen too much, is also outstanding here, and it marks one of the best performances of his career. Kathleen Turner, is kind of wasted in a throwaway part, that really adds nothing to the film, and this flaw is so minor, it doesn't hurt the film from being great. The direction, from David(Devil Wears Prada)Frankel, is masterful. Tight or breezy, when needed.

FOX has provided the correct 2.35:1 aspect ratio for this1080p/AVC MPEG-4 blu-ray release.  From the opening scene and throughout, the cinematography is beautiful, capturing a wide range of seasonal and location changes. The rich colors and saturated look of Florida and the more subdued, cooler colors of Philadelphia are always perfectly balanced. Detail is exquisite, and there isn't a single scene that appears flat! A great looking transfer!

FOX has provided a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 mix.  While not an aggressive mix, it's always engaging, and surrounds offer some ambient effects that add to the film's atmosphere with just the right note. There are plenty of separation effects across the front soundstage, and even though the music tends to be front channel focused, without the rear speaker involvement one expects, the film's overall listening experience leaves one pleased and not wanting for more.

FOX has provided a digital copy and "movie only" dvd copy. Additionally, there are deleted scenes, a gag reel, and some brief featurettes.